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Earlier this October, mom, Omairis Taylor, posted a picture on Facebook of a blue Halloween bucket her child with autism would carry for his night of trick-0r-treating.

Her post, now deleted, said her child and others non-verbal like him might not say “trick or treat” at people’s doors. It’s kind of a game for people giving out candy to wait for the greeting or to ask to hear it before putting the goods in the bucket or bag

She said:

And there I go explaining the situation for the next five blocks. This year, we will be trying the BLUE BUCKET to signify he has autism. And there I go explaining the situation for the next five blocks,” she said. “This year, we will be trying the BLUE BUCKET to signify he has autism.

The fact that the post went viral is not surprising. What was more interesting was the backlash.

This Halloween, you might see some children carrying blue buckets. The buckets are meant to alert candy givers that the…

Posted by WFAA on Wednesday, October 16, 2019

While the post had thousands of likes and shares, many people commented they do not support using blue buckets, or anything blue, signaling their children are different, especially on a night where the kids just want to have fun like everyone else.

April 2 has typically been a day to turn your Facebook profile picture blue or to use hashtags like #lightitupblue to spread awareness of autism. But, like many other social media awareness campaigns, there is no call to action. Just…be aware.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Most people are already aware of autism. There are so many developmental issues out there affecting kids. Are parents required to label their children with each one?

What’s needed is money for research. Families need peer support. And, people need to be patient with everyone who rings their bells on Halloween night. Do we really need a kid or teen’s life story?

It’s a fun night. Give out the candy!