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The majority of people in the world will never join MENSA – and organization that admits members based on IQ – their entire lives.

When you’ve got the smarts, you’ve got the smarts, though, and this two-year-old was far beyond his peers.

Most of our kids are still mastering eating with silverware and possibly considering not crapping in their pants at two, but not Kashe Quest.

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A post shared by Kashe Quest (@kashequest)

Nope. She and her 146 IQ are busy qualifying for MENSA.

At two years old, Kashe can count to 100, identify all 50 states by shape, and is busy learning Spanish, English, and sign language (all at the same time).

Her mother, Sukhjit Athwal, says she noticed that, by 18 months, her daughter had “recognized all the alphabet, numbers, colors, and shapes.”

MENSA, the high IQ society that admits those with average scores in the top 2% of the population, started to take notice.

Their executive director, Trevor Mitchell, made a statement to Fox News over email.

“Kashe is a remarkable girl, and what may be rare here is that Kashe’s gifts have been recognized so early in life.

Her parents will be able to help her with some of the unique challenges gifted youth encounter.

Being the smartest person in the room isn’t always easy, and MENSA understands the importance of being challenged by others, of having our potential recognized, and of celebrating achievements.”

Despite all of this, Athwal says that, in most ways, Kashe is like other kids – and she wants to keep it that way.

“I think one of the biggest things with me and my daughter is making sure she has a childhood and we don’t force anything on her.

We’re kind of going at her pace and we want to just make sure that she is youthful for as long as she can be.”

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A post shared by Kashe Quest (@kashequest)

Special or not, two-year-olds should be able to just be kids, so it’s great to hear her parents have good heads on their shoulders.

What would you do if you realized your toddler might be smarter than you are?

Let’s discuss in the comments!